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Watts Atelier’s Skill Building Challenge 21 – Self Portrait

Watts Atelier Skill Building Challenge 21 - Self Portrait by Nemo

This is my entry for the second month of the Master Skill Building Challenge at the Watts Atelier of the Arts.
It’s actually the very first complete portrait in charcoal I draw, and I admit I am satisfied enough with the result. It’s by no means perfect, of course. I could have pushed the darks a bit more, and the nose is definitely smaller than the original (heh…).
Overall though, it’s decent enough to participate this month’s challenge.

Here follows the whole WIP, as always good luck to all participants!




Watts Atelier Skill Building Challenge 21 - Self Portrait by Nemo week 4 wipWatts Atelier Skill Building Challenge 21 - Self Portrait by Nemo week 3 finalWatts Atelier Skill Building Challenge 21 - Self Portrait by Nemo week 3 wipWatts Atelier Skill Building Challenge 21 - Self Portrait by Nemo week 2 finalWatts Atelier Skill Building Challenge 21 - Self Portrait by Nemo week 1 finalWatts Atelier Skill Building Challenge 21 - Self Portrait by Nemo week 1 lay-in

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Watts Atelier’s Skill Building Challenge 20 – Skull

Watts Atelier Skill Building Challenge 20 Final Skull

 

Here is my final piece for the Watts Atelier Skill Building Challenge 20. Yes, it’s Murray!
He’s very proud of having been chosen as subject for this challenge, hopefully I will get at least a mention.
Below is the whole wip, starting from the very first lay in to the last partial of week 4 (it’s a monthly challenge)

Good luck everyone!

week1_layinweek1_wip
week1_finalweek2_wip

week2_final

week3_wip

week3_finalweek4_wip

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My version of James Gurney’s Taboret

I have been wanting to make something similar to James Gurney’s Taboret since when I first saw it. Last summer I finally got a small drawer from my carpenters, and last months I started renovating and modifying it. This is the end result, I am pretty satisfied with it.

taboret-opentaboret-1taboret-2

taboret-gouachetaboret-drawing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is how it looked like before, and while working on it

taboret_before

taboret_wip

It’s obviously not as fancy as Gurney’s, but I am planning to make it better as soon as I get more materials

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Mannequins over, and over…and over again

This naughty fellow is known as block-form mannequin, and it’s probably the one that can piss you off the most. Why? Because of the straight edges. If you get one angle just slightly wrong, the pose will simply be completely off. Thus, the frustration! I first copied the handouts of the Watts Atelier, then tried to figure out some from photos, directly. This is the second mannequin I studied, right after the Skeleton Mannequin
Block Form Mannequins from the Watts Atelier Handouts

 

The next ones are made out of photos

Block Form Mannequins from photos

 

The next ones are “ovoid” mannequins. Feeling a lot more like real people, and they are less frustrating, and more forgiving than the block form one!
Ovoid Mannequins in Christmas fashion Ovoid Mannequins from real figures Ovoid Mannequins from the Watts Atelier

The last page is a study from the handouts, while others are from real people.
Ah, Merry Christmas! 😀

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The classic Asaro Head

I have been working on the asaro head recently, this time with an added complexity. This is actually the “Classic” model, while the previous one was simplified, and supposed to be memorized. I am actually trying to memorize this  as well, although I admit the facets are a lot, and hard to remember.

Classic Asaro Head - Complex 3/4 Classic Asaro Head - Easy 3/4 Classic Asaro Head - Front Classic Asaro Head - Easy Profile Classic Asaro Head - Complex Profile

P.S. I am not drunk, the head actually does have two different sides, one easier, the other more resembling a real face.

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Skeleton mannequins

Skeleton Mannequins 1 Skeleton Mannequins 3

I started working on figures alongside the head. The skeleton mannequin is the first one examined at the Watts Atelier, and I admit it’s really interesting to use! It has enough flexibility to convey dynamism and movement, though I admit finding the landmarks is not so easy, nor it is to get the proportions right.
The above are all copied from photos, meaning I had to see “through” the figures, identify the meaningful areas, place and abstract the simplified versions of the bones.
Females are a lot harder to draw, since landmarks are harder to find, while men with a stronger musculature seem a lot easier.
The bottom right female mannequin was an attempt in finding the proportions out of Loomis’ book, Figure Drawing For All it’s Worth, though I admit it looks a bit funky! 😛

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